Australian researchers design bespoke surgical snakebots


Friday, 19 July, 2019


Australian researchers design bespoke surgical snakebots

Researchers at the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision say they are pushing the boundaries of evolution in creating bespoke, miniaturised surgical robots uniquely matched to individual patient anatomy.

The cutting-edge research project is the brainchild of Centre PhD researcher Andrew Razjigaev, who impressed HRH The Duke of York with the centre’s first SnakeBot prototype designed for knee arthroscopy, last November. Now, the young researcher, backed by the centre’s world-leading Medical and Healthcare Robotics Group, is taking the next step in the surgical SnakeBot’s design.

In place of a single robot, the new plan envisages multiple snake-like robots attached to a RAVEN II surgical robotic research platform, all working together to improve patient outcomes.

The novelty of the project extends to development of an evolutionary computational design algorithm that creates one-of-a-kind, patient-specific SnakeBots in a ‘survival-of-the-fittest’ battle.

Only the most optimal design survives, specifically suited to fit, flexibly manoeuvre and see inside a patient’s knee, doubling as a surgeon’s eyes and tools, with the added bonus of being low-cost (3D printed) and disposable.

Leading the QUT-based Medical and Healthcare Robotics Group, Centre Chief Investigator Jonathan Roberts and Associate Investigator Ross Crawford (who is also an orthopaedic surgeon) said the semi-autonomous surgical system could revolutionise keyhole surgery in ways not before imagined.

Professor Crawford stressed the aim of the robotic system — expected to incorporate surgical dual-arm telemanipulation and autonomous vision-based control — was to assist, not replace, surgeons, ultimately improving patient outcomes.

“At the moment surgeons use what are best described as rigid ‘one-size-fits-all’ tools for knee arthroscopy procedures, even though patients and their anatomy can vary significantly,” Professor Crawford said. “The research project aims to design snake-like robots as miniaturised and highly dexterous surgical tools, fitted with computer vision capabilities and the ability to navigate around obstacles in confined spaces such as the anatomy of the human body,” Professor Crawford said.

“Dexterity is incredibly important as the robots are not only required to reach surgical sites but perform complicated surgical procedures via telemanipulation.”

Professor Roberts said the research project was a world-first for surgical robotics targeting knee arthroscopy and would not be possible without the multidisciplinary expertise of researchers at the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision.

“One of the most exciting things about this project is that it is bringing many ideas from the robotics community together to form a practical solution to a real-world problem,” he said.

“The project has been proceeding at a rapid pace, mainly due to the hard work and brilliance of Andrew, supported by a team of advisors with backgrounds in mechanical engineering, mechatronics, aerospace, medicine, biology, physics and chemistry.”

Due to complete his PhD research project by early 2021, Andrew Razjigaev graduated as a mechatronics engineer at QUT in 2017 and has been a part of the centre’s Medical and Healthcare Robotics Group since 2016.

“Robotics is all about helping people in some way and what I’m most excited about is that this project may lead to improved health outcomes, fewer complications and faster patient recovery,” Razjigaev said.

“That’s what really drives my research — being able to help people and make a positive difference. Knee arthroscopy is one of the most common orthopaedic procedures in the world, with around four million procedures a year, so this project could have a huge impact.”

Razjigaev said he hoped his work would lead to real-world development of new surgical tools.

“It’s also incredibly cool to use evolution in my work! There’s no question we’re witnessing the age-old process — the only difference being it’s happening inside a computer instead of nature.”

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